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US 2 Westbound Trestle – Fish, floods, and wetlands

The area surrounding the existing trestle presents many challenges. The structure crosses fish-bearing streams, floodplains, and wetlands. There may also be cultural resources that will require consultation with local Native American tribes and other agencies.

Fish-bearing streams

This map shows the fish presence by species located beneath the US 2 trestle. Orange is used to represent Chinook salmon, chum salmon, coho salmon, pink salmon, bull trout, cutthroat trout and steelhead trout. The pink color represents sockeye salmon, the dotted line represents largemouth bass and the purple dots indicate a fish passage barrier.
This map shows the fish presence by species located beneath the US 2 trestle. Orange is used to represent Chinook salmon, chum salmon, coho salmon, pink salmon, bull trout, cutthroat trout and steelhead trout. The pink color represents sockeye salmon, the dotted line represents largemouth bass and the purple dots indicate a fish passage barrier.

There are fish in the streams and rivers near the US 2 trestle. On Ebey Island, streams and irrigation channels serve as homes for Chinook salmon, chum salmon, coho salmon, pink salmon, bull trout, cutthroat and steelhead trout. In addition, the Snohomish River also has populations of largemouth bass, and sockeye salmon are found in Ebey Slough.

Floodplains

This map shows the FEMA flood data of the Snohomish River located beneath US 2. The national flood hazard zones are indicated by various colors. The magenta indicates the floodway of the river. The light blue shading represents an area with a 100-year flood risk, which means it is more likely than other areas to flood and has a 1% or greater chance to flood every year. The dark blue shading represents an area with a 500-year flood risk, meaning this area has a 0.2% likelihood to flood in year.
This map shows the FEMA flood data of the Snohomish River located beneath US 2. The national flood hazard zones are indicated by various colors. The magenta indicates the floodway of the river. The light blue shading represents an area with a 100-year flood risk, which means it is more likely than other areas to flood and has a 1% or greater chance to flood every year. The dark blue shading represents an area with a 500-year flood risk, meaning this area has a 0.2% likelihood to flood in year.

Directly under the trestle is Ebey Island. The entire island is a floodplain. Areas of that are considered a floodway. A floodway is the channel of a river or stream and the land next to it that must remain free from obstruction so that a 100-year flood can be carried downstream.

Wetlands

This map shows the wetlands located beneath the US 2 trestle. The lighter green areas are generally swampy/marshy areas with rooted plants and grasses. Dark green areas are mostly taller shrubs and trees. The teal area near Home Acres Road, is a WSDOT wetland mitigation site.
This map shows the wetlands located beneath the US 2 trestle. The lighter green areas are generally swampy/marshy areas with rooted plants and grasses. Dark green areas are mostly taller shrubs and trees. The teal area near Home Acres Road, is a WSDOT wetland mitigation site.

Dozens of wetlands that surround the US 2 trestle must be protected from highway storm runoff during construction. These wetlands consist mostly of swampy or marshy areas with rooted plants and grasses such as cattails, reeds and ferns. Other areas are dominated by woody vegetation from ground level to more than 20 feet tall. The plants found in these areas include willows, alder, white pine, mature red maple and elm trees.