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WSDOT Active Transportation Plan – Map analysis for your feedback

When you go for a walk or a bike ride, you know some streets and roads feel more comfortable than others. This page shares our efforts to analyze the specific components that make you feel that way when it comes to moving along or across a state route. We invite you to tell us what you think about the way we're approaching this on the comment form below.

This page shares a preliminary draft analysis of the Level of Traffic Stress (LTS) on state highways. The maps represent the level of stress a person walking or biking along or across a state-owned roadway might experience based on the traffic speed, volume, and type of facilities for walking and rolling.

When finalized, this analysis will be one of several tools WSDOT will use to make decisions about changes to state roadways and connections with local streets, roads and trails.

LTS was calculated from the best available information using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software. The software creates color-coded maps that show how stressful state roadways are for those walking and bicycling, with blue being lowest stress and red highest. LTS is calculated separately for pedestrians and bicyclists.

The calculations consider whether a location is a population center or rural.

Population centers include cities and small town centers. Such places are expected to provide for the needs of more roadway users including younger and older people as well as those with disabilities, so they are held to a higher standard. On the map, population center LTS ratings appear as a solid line.

Rural refers to sections of roadway where there are fewer places to go, such as stores and schools. Those walking or biking in rural areas were assumed to be more confident travelers who would tolerate more challenging conditions (such as being near faster moving vehicles). Rural LTS ratings appear as a dashed line.

In some cases our information is incomplete. In addition, we don’t have data on the quality of the measured characteristics (for example, whether a shoulder is in good condition from the perspective of someone on a bicycle or in a wheelchair). We will continue to update the analysis as new information is collected, including the addition of data on local trails.

For more detailed information review About Our State Routes Analysis.

Pedestrian Level of Traffic Stress (PLTS)

For a given roadway, PLTS was based on:

  • Presence or absence of
    • Shoulders (+ width)
    • Intersection signals
  • Number of
    • Traffic lanes
    • Vehicles per day
  • Posted speed limits

Bicyclist Level of Traffic Stress (BLTS)

For a given roadway, BLTS was based on:

  • Presence or absence of
    • Shoulders (+ width)
    • Bicycle Lanes (+ width)
    • Intersection signals
  • Number of
    • Traffic lanes
    • Vehicles per day
  • Posted speed limits

Map Navigation

View the map in a separate browser window

When you view the map, click on Layers (the icon that looks like stacked sheets of paper) to choose what you're viewing:

  • Intersections
  • Population Center (solid lines)
    • Bicycle Level of Traffic Stress
    • Pedestrian Level of Traffic Stress
  • Rural (dashed lines)
    • Bicycle Level of Traffic Stress
    • Pedestrian Level of Traffic Stress

Color coding on the map:

  • Blue: LTS 1 (lowest stress)
  • Green: LTS 2
  • Yellow: LTS 3
  • Red: LTS 4 (highest stress)

What this is not

This is not a form for reporting an issue or requesting that something be fixed. To report a maintenance issue contact Maintenance Operations, 360-705-7850 or wsdotmaintenanceoperations@wsdot.wa.gov. They will direct your inquiry to the appropriate region office. You may also contact a region directly; find your region office on this page.

This is not an official final WSDOT map of the Level of Traffic Stress on state right-of-way. This is a temporary, draft data analysis prepared by consultants under contract for the Washington State Department of Transportation to facilitate stakeholder input for the state active transportation plan.

The data is available for viewing in ArcGIS Online only and is not to be downloaded or redistributed. Once the review process is completed the data will no longer be available.

The Washington State Department of Transportation shall not be liable for any activity involving these data, including, but not limited to, lost profits or savings or any other economic or consequential damages. Nor does the Department warrant the fitness of the data for use for a particular purpose, or the installation of the data, its use, or the results obtained.

Tell us what you think!

We would like to know what you think about the stress levels you see in the maps here. We are looking for general reactions rather than specific sections of roadways, or a single intersection. Things you might choose to address in your comments:

  • Does this way of analyzing the quality of facilities for walking, bicycling and rolling on or across a state highway seem like a good basis for prioritizing future changes?
  • Do you notice roadways or intersections that seem more or less stressful for walking and bicycling than what we are showing?
  • Does our description above of the difference between people typically walking/biking in population centers (wide range of ages and disabilities) vs rural places (more comfortable with some traffic) seem appropriate?
  • Would you find it useful to apply this approach to an update of the state bicycle map?
  • Should WSDOT and local agencies build on this approach to include information about LTS on adjacent local and regional facilities?

In some cases, if you identify a place where our color coding doesn't seem to match what you think the highway is like we may be able to make changes to the tool and how it's calculating stress. In other cases it may help us understand the need for more information about roadways or identify data that should be updated or corrected.